Thursday, November 19

Registration opens October 14, 2020

WORKSHOP

Communicating Across Disciplines in a Collaboration

SESSION

What do your data say? Tools for teaching quantitative approaches in the virtual classroom

Madhav Mani, PhD, Eric Johnson, Caroline Freitag, PhD

Northwestern University

We will present a case study on how to apply evidence-based teaching practices to courses with a significant quantitative component, both in person and in virtual classrooms. We will introduce participants to a framework for creating clear learning goals and then developing classroom activities and assessments to fit those course goals. We will share our strategies for implementing engaging learning activities for both in person and virtual classrooms, leaving participants with an instructional playbook and tools to put into effect in their classrooms.

SESSION

New Mathematics at the Interface of Math and Biology

William Kath, PhD

Northwestern University

Historically, biology has inspired new mathematics, from Maxwell to Turing. In turn, breakthroughs in mathematics have generated new insights in biology. The sheer complexity of living beings lends itself to exploration of fields such as topology, complex geometry, dynamical systems, and probability theory. This workshop is meant to help bridge the gap between mathematics and biology by showing the potential for biology to influence and inform new math. Current research areas that exemplify the math:biology interface will be presented by center faculty members and scholars.

WORKSHOP

Collaborating with Life Scientists for Mathematicians

Scientific breakthroughs are driven by paradigm shifts that are often triggered by a new perspective or approach. Collaborations across disciplines such as applying mathematical thinking and analysis to life sciences often bring these new outlooks. In this panel discussion, NSF-Simons Center for Quantitative Biology faculty from pure and applied math, physics, and statistics will share their experiences collaborating with faculty from the life sciences. During the session, they will discuss successful approaches and strategies for collaboration, ways to communicate efficiently and effectively across disciplines, and will provide advice for PhD and early career scientists who are seeking to form collaborations between mathematics and the life sciences.

SESSION

Postdoc Positions at NSF-Simons Center for Quantitative Biology

Richard Carthew, PhD, William Kath, PhD

Northwestern University

The NSF-Simons Center for Quantitative Biology at Northwestern University is a place where mathematical scientists and developmental biologists intensely work together on a broad range of questions arising from investigations into the biology of animal development. The scientific goals of the Center require new approaches to studying the growth and development of living organisms. To promote innovation and creativity, the Center uses funds from the Simons Foundation and the NSF to provide salary and research support for postdoctoral fellows. This session will describe the two options for postdoctoral fellows, the NSF-Simons Fellows program and the Center Scholars program. At the end of the session, attendees will have a chance to talk with investigators looking to hire for open positions.

SESSION

Applying to Grad School at Northwestern

Graduate Program Directors: Antonio Auffinger (Mathematics), Gregory Beitel (Masters in Quantitative and Systems Biology), Pamela Carpentier (Driskill Graduate Program in Life Sciences), David Chopp (Engineering Sciences and Applied Mathematics), Deborah Klos Dehring (Interdisciplinary Biological Sciences Program). Facilitator: Tiffany Leighton Ozmina

Northwestern University

Quantitative biology touches the research programs of faculty across the university, from applied math to math, developmental biology to biomedical sciences, epidemiology to synthetic biology, neuroscience to physics. This session is meant for undergraduates. We will present how to navigate Northwestern’s graduate school application, introduce graduate programs with faculty who utilize quantitative biology, and meet the graduate program directors. Program Directors: Antonio Auffinger (Mathematics), Gregory Beitel (Masters in Quantitative and Systems Biology), Pamela Carpentier (Driskill Graduate Program in Life Sciences), David Chopp (Engineering Sciences and Applied Mathematics), Deborah Klos Dehring (Interdisciplinary Biological Sciences Program)

Northwestern-University_vertical_white.p

National Science Foundation 1764421

Simons Foundation/SFARI 597491-RWC

2200 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208

847-491-5571

NSF-Simons-QBio@northwestern.edu

www.quantitativebiology.northwestern.edu